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A majority of Americans agree with Occupy Wall Street, polls show

A majority of Americans — and almost a third of Republicans — agree with the aims of the Occupy Wall St. movement, according to polls taken over the last ten days. Alex Altman of TIME’s Swampland blog writes: Among those surveyed by TIME who were familiar with Occupy Wall Street, sweeping majorities agreed with the movement’s grievance that the gap between rich and poor has grown too large, including 85% of households making under $50,000 per year and 65% of those making more than $100,000 annually

Jul 31, 2020
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A majority of Americans — and almost a third of Republicans — agree with the aims of the Occupy Wall St. movement, according to polls taken over the last ten days.
Alex Altmanof TIME’s Swampland blog writes:
Among those surveyed by TIME who were familiar with Occupy Wall Street, sweeping majorities agreed with the movement’s grievance that the gap between rich and poor has grown too large, including 85% of households making under $50,000 per year and 65% of those making more than $100,000 annually. Almost three-quarters of households earning up to $100,000 backed the contention that the rich should pay more taxes. Even 52% of households making more than $100,000 per year agreed. Seventy-three percent support a surtax on millionaires to help close the federal deficit, a provision Senate Democrats recently tacked onto Obama’s proposal to put the GOP in the uncomfortable position of opposing it.
More details on the TIME poll here.
A United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll surveyed 1,007 adults between Oct. 13-16 also found broad support for taxing the rich and sympathy for Occupy Wall St.
Matthew Cooper of the National Journalreports:
When it comes to those Wall Street protests, there’s also a populist streak: Remarkably, nearly one-third of Republicans—31 percent—completely or mostly agree with their aims. The sour economy has sparked some class resentments in unexpected places, it seems. Those stirrings are unlikely to come to fruition in this divided Congress, but there’s no indication they’re going away anytime soon.
Camilo Wood

Camilo Wood

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Camilo Wood has over two decades of experience as a writer and journalist, specializing in finance and economics. With a degree in Economics and a background in financial research and analysis, Camilo brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to his writing. Throughout his career, Camilo has contributed to numerous publications, covering a wide range of topics such as global economic trends, investment strategies, and market analysis. His articles are recognized for their insightful analysis and clear explanations, making complex financial concepts accessible to readers. Camilo's experience includes working in roles related to financial reporting, analysis, and commentary, allowing him to provide readers with accurate and trustworthy information. His dedication to journalistic integrity and commitment to delivering high-quality content make him a trusted voice in the fields of finance and journalism.
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