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Astronauts Lose Tool Bag By Mistake During A Spacewalk On The ISS

Astronauts lose tool bag by mistake during a spacewalk on the ISS. NASA astronauts Jasmin Moghbeli and Loral O’Hara conducted their inaugural spacewalk this month, maneuvering through space with a tool bag in tow.

Author:Karan Emery
Reviewer:Daniel James
Nov 14, 2023
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Astronauts lose tool bag by mistake during a spacewalk on the ISS.NASA astronauts Jasmin Moghbeli and Loral O’Hara conducted their inaugural spacewalk this month, maneuvering through space with a tool bag in tow. The space agency reported that the duo successfully completed maintenance tasks outside the International Space Station (ISS) in a duration of six hours and 42 minutes.
During the spacewalk on November 1, Moghbeli and O’Hara focused on the station's solar arrays, responsible for tracking the sun. Despite their efforts, they ran out of time to remove and stow a communications electronics box. Opting to defer this task to a subsequent spacewalk, the astronauts instead conducted an assessment of how the job could be accomplished in the future.
In the course of the lengthy mission, a tool bag slipped away from the astronauts, leading to its "loss," as reported by NASA. Flight controllers were able to spot the drifting bag using the external cameras of the International Space Station (ISS). Fortunately, the tools contained in the bag were not essential for the completion of the remaining tasks.
“Mission Control analyzed the bag’s trajectory and determined that risk of recontacting the station is low and that the onboard crew and space station are safe with no action required,” NASA said on its official blog.
As per EarthSky, a website that monitors celestial occurrences, the tool bag is presently orbiting Earth ahead of the International Space Station (ISS). There is a chance that it could be observed from Earth using a pair of binoculars over the next few months until it eventually disintegrates in our planet's atmosphere.
Instances of astronauts losing tools in space are not unprecedented. In 2008, Heide Stefanyshyn-Piper experienced a similar incident when her tool bag drifted away while she was engaged in the maintenance of a malfunctioning rotary joint, cleaning and lubricating its gears. Another occurrence took place during a 2006 spacewalk, where astronauts Piers Sellers and Michael Fossum lost a 14-inch spatula while testing a repair method for the space shuttle.
Space debris, like these lost objects, refers to artificial materials orbiting Earth that are no longer functional. This category encompasses a range of items, from small paint chips to discarded parts from rocket launches.

Conclusion

In September 2023, the European Space Agencyreported that there were 35,290 objects being tracked and cataloged by various space surveillance networks. The cumulative mass of these objects in Earth's orbit exceeded 11,000 tons.
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Karan Emery

Karan Emery

Author
Karan Emery, an accomplished researcher and leader in health sciences, biotechnology, and pharmaceuticals, brings over two decades of experience to the table. Holding a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences from Stanford University, Karan's credentials underscore her authority in the field. With a track record of groundbreaking research and numerous peer-reviewed publications in prestigious journals, Karan's expertise is widely recognized in the scientific community. Her writing style is characterized by its clarity and meticulous attention to detail, making complex scientific concepts accessible to a broad audience. Apart from her professional endeavors, Karan enjoys cooking, learning about different cultures and languages, watching documentaries, and visiting historical landmarks. Committed to advancing knowledge and improving health outcomes, Karan Emery continues to make significant contributions to the fields of health, biotechnology, and pharmaceuticals.
Daniel James

Daniel James

Reviewer
Daniel James is a distinguished gerontologist, author, and professional coach known for his expertise in health and aging. With degrees from Georgia Tech and UCLA, including a diploma in gerontology from the University of Boston, Daniel brings over 15 years of experience to his work. His credentials also include a Professional Coaching Certification, enhancing his credibility in personal development and well-being. In his free time, Daniel is an avid runner and tennis player, passionate about fitness, wellness, and staying active. His commitment to improving lives through health education and coaching reflects his passion and dedication in both professional and personal endeavors.
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