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Israeli Hospitals Go Underground To Operate During Lebanese Rocket Attacks

Israeli hospitals go underground to operate during Lebanese rocket attacks. As fighting between Israel and Lebanese extremists heats up, the Galilee Medical Center in northern Israel is making plans to keep treating patients despite the danger.

Author:Dexter Cooke
Reviewer:Hajra Shannon
Nov 09, 2023
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Israeli hospitals go underground to operate during Lebanese rocket attacks. As fighting between Israel and Lebanese extremists heats up, the Galilee Medical Center in northern Israel is making plans to keep treating patients despite the danger.
We are underground with the patients because we are preparing ourselves to continue taking care of our patients, even under fire.- Dr. Masad Barhoum, the director of the hospital
On October 7, when Hamas-backed terrorists infiltrated from the Gaza Strip into southern Israel, murdering over 1,400 people and seizing over 240 prisoners, the hospital transferred its first patients underground.
Since then, Israel has attacked Gaza, governed by Hamas, killing over 10,000 Palestinians and crippling overloaded hospitals. The battle has also sparked a "limited spillover" of conflict between Israeli soldiers and terrorists in nearby Lebanon.
Every day, rockets and artillery from Iran-backed Hezbollah and other armed organizations in Lebanon rain down on northern Israel, and scores of airstrikes have resulted in the deaths of civilians on both sides of the border.
In Israel's 2006 conflict with Lebanon, a rocket from Lebanon struck the hospital's fourth floor, but the personnel had already relocated medical treatment underground, thanks to Galilee's wartime defenses.

Hospital Beds Replace Parking Spots In Underground Garage

Rambam Health Care Campus, Israel's biggest trauma hospital, converted a three-story subterranean parking lot into an underground hospital. Beds, oxygen supplies, monitors, and a respirator have been added to the space.
There are 1,400 beds available underground at this facility. Dr. Netanel Horowitz is concerned that increased border action may force them to go underground as they work to put up the garage-turned-hospital in Haifa.
In response to Israel's attack in Gaza and its actions towards Lebanon, Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah has declared his organization's willingness to intensify the fight.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has also made it clear that Hezbollah would pay a heavy price for attacking Israel from Lebanon.

Model Hospital Away From The Border

Rambam Health Care Campus, Israel's biggest trauma hospital, converted a three-story subterranean parking lot into an underground hospital. Beds, oxygen supplies, monitors, and a respirator have been added to the space.
There are 1,400 beds available underground at this facility. Dr. Netanel Horowitz is concerned that increased border action may force them to go underground as they work to put up the garage-turned-hospital in Haifa.
In response to Israel's attack in Gaza and its actions towards Lebanon, Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah has declared his organization's willingness to intensify the fight.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has also made it clear that Hezbollah would pay a heavy price for attacking Israel from Lebanon.
We have drills to receive such trauma cases, but no one prepared me for receiving family member. I went from being a doctor to being a family member and it was a bit confusing. It took me several moments to cool down my nerves and start after receiving them.- Dr. Bahir Sirhan, Galilee hospital's emergency department
Dr. Bahir Sirhan works in the emergency department at Galilee.
Dr. Bahir Sirhan works in the emergency department at Galilee.

Staff Prepared For Underground Migration

The Rambam Hospital in Haifa, Israel, is housed under a three-story underground parking garage that was once used for storing cars.
The subterranean facilities, which were previously employed during the COVID-19 epidemic, have been undergoing a drill to enable nurses and physicians become acclimated to working in the location.
Triage and care of simulated patients, portrayed by colleagues and Israeli military personnel, is part of the exercise. Staff members will need to practice wheeling beds in the correct direction because of the noise levels and the relocation of hospital wings.
Nurses, however, are always sure that they will find something out eventually. The hospital's pediatric dialysis unit is now housed in the garage, where it has been fully operational for some time.

Final Words

All around Israel, but notably in the north, hospitals have moved underground or are making preparations to do so.
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Dexter Cooke

Dexter Cooke

Author
Dexter Cooke is an economist, marketing strategist, and orthopedic surgeon with over 20 years of experience crafting compelling narratives that resonate worldwide. He holds a Journalism degree from Columbia University, an Economics background from Yale University, and a medical degree with a postdoctoral fellowship in orthopedic medicine from the Medical University of South Carolina. Dexter’s insights into media, economics, and marketing shine through his prolific contributions to respected publications and advisory roles for influential organizations. As an orthopedic surgeon specializing in minimally invasive knee replacement surgery and laparoscopic procedures, Dexter prioritizes patient care above all. Outside his professional pursuits, Dexter enjoys collecting vintage watches, studying ancient civilizations, learning about astronomy, and participating in charity runs.
Hajra Shannon

Hajra Shannon

Reviewer
Hajra Shannona is a highly experienced journalist with over 9 years of expertise in news writing, investigative reporting, and political analysis. She holds a Bachelor's degree in Journalism from Columbia University and has contributed to reputable publications focusing on global affairs, human rights, and environmental sustainability. Hajra's authoritative voice and trustworthy reporting reflect her commitment to delivering insightful news content. Beyond journalism, she enjoys exploring new cultures through travel and pursuing outdoor photography
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