Latest In

News

Obesity Drug Helped Teens Lower Their BMI And Lose Weight, New Study Finds

Possible new weight loss aid for obese youth in the near future. This week, the New England Journal of Medicine published the results of a clinical trial showing that adolescents who received weekly injections of an appetite-suppressing drug lost an average of 14.7% of their starting bodyweight, while those who received a placebo and counseling on diet and exercise gained an average of 2.7%. A total of 201 adolescents (aged 12 to 17) from three medical facilities in the US, Europe, and Mexico participated in the study. Obesity drug helped teens lower their bmi and lose weight.

Author:Rhyley Carney
Reviewer:Paula M. Graham
Nov 07, 20225.8K Shares115K Views
Possible new weight loss aid for obese youth in the near future. This week, the New England Journal of Medicine published the results of a clinical trial showing that adolescents who received weekly injections of an appetite-suppressing drug lost an average of 14.7% of their starting bodyweight, while those who received a placebo and counseling on diet and exercise gained an average of 2.7%.
A total of 201 adolescents (aged 12 to 17) from three medical facilities in the US, Europe, and Mexico participated in the study. Obesity drug helped teens lower their bmi and lose weight.
According to co-author and co-director of the Center for Pediatric Obesity Medicine at the University of Minnesota, Aaron Kelly, more than 40% of research participants who received the medicine in addition to lifestyle counseling reduced their body mass index by 20% or more by the conclusion of the study.
Rates of obesity are increasing, not just in the U.S., but all over the world. Typically, we make lifestyle recommendations: Eat more vegetables; don't eat fried food; don't drink soda. But unfortunately, we live in a very obesogenic environment, so it can be very hard to make those changes. There is a real need for safe and effective medications to treat obesity.- Silva Arslanian, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Semaglutide Appetite Suppressant

Semaglutide is an appetite suppressant and weight loss aid that works by mimicking the hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 to stimulate the parts of the brain responsible for managing food intake. This medication was given the green light in 2021 to help individuals who were overweight or obese maintain their weight long-term.
Researches enlisted 201 obese or overweight teenagers (ages 12-18) from various sites to see whether semaglutide is similarly successful in this age group. All participants in the study were counseled on good eating and exercise habits in addition to receiving a subcutaneous injection of semaglutide 2.4 mg once weekly or a placebo.
At the end of 68 weeks, individuals using semaglutide were much more likely to have lost at least 5% of their body weight than those taking a placebo (72.5 vs. 17%).
The results are amazing.For a person who is 5 foot, 5 inches tall and weighs 240 pounds, the average reduction in BMI equates to shedding about 40 pounds.- Arslanian, Pediatric Clinical and Translational Research Center

Weight Loss Drug For Adults Shows Unprecedented Results In Teens

How Drug Affects Obesity

Almost one-fifth of the world's children and adolescents are overweight or obese. Lower life expectancy and increased vulnerability to conditions including diabetes mellitus type 2, cardiovascular disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, sleep apnea, and several malignancies have been related to this chronic condition. Depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and other mental health problems are common in overweight adolescents.
Waist circumference, HbA1c (a blood sugar measure), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and liver enzymes all improved more in the semaglutide group than in the placebo group, according to the data. However, neither blood pressure nor high-density lipoprotein cholesterol differed significantly across the groups.

Final Words

The physical comfort of semaglutide-treated participants was significantly higher than that of placebo-treated participants, contributing to overall improvements in weight-related quality of life indicators. The study authors point out that this is the first medicine for treating obesity to be associated with positive effects on teenagers' quality of life.
Jump to
Rhyley Carney

Rhyley Carney

Author
Paula M. Graham

Paula M. Graham

Reviewer
Latest Articles
Popular Articles