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Prince Harry Loses Legal Bid To Pay For Police Protection In The UK

Prince Harry loses legal bid to pay for police protection against the U.K. government because it wouldn't let him pay privately for personal police protection for himself and his family when the royal family's divorced members visit the country.

Author:Camilo Wood
Reviewer:Dexter Cooke
May 24, 2023
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80.6K Views
Prince Harry loses legal bid to pay for police protectionagainst the U.K. government because it wouldn't let him pay privately for personal police protection for himself and his family when the royal family's divorced members visit the country. A judge in London's High Court turned down Harry's request to review a government decision that says he can't pay for police protection when he and his family are in the UK.
The executive committee for the protection of royalty and public figures, also known as Ravec, decided that Harry and Meghan Markle no longer needed their taxpayer-funded police security when they stopped being senior royals and moved to California in 2020.

Prince Harry Loses Legal Bid To Pay For His Police Protection in U.K. | PEOPLE

The Press Association says that Prince Harry lost a case in the U.K. because he paid for private police security. The prince, who is also known as the Duke of Sussex, tried to start a judicial review because his request to hire special U.K. police officers to protect him and his family was denied. A judicial review is a court procedure that looks into how a public body came to a decision. It doesn't look at how good or bad the choice is.
When Harry and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, moved first to Canada and then to California, they took a "step back" from the Royal Family and lost their right to police protection paid for by the public.
Harry, who lives in California with Meghan and their children Archie and Lilibet, has said he wants police protection for his family while in Britain and is willing to pay for it himself. The Home Office has turned down this request. On Tuesday, the judge said that Harry could not try to get that order changed.
This court case is one of many that Prince Harry is involved in right now in the UK. He is expected to go back to London next month to testify in a different trial against the Mirror Newspaper Group (MNG) about phone-hacking claims. That trial started on May 10 and is expected to last seven weeks.
After Harry and Meghan left their royal jobs and went to California in 2020, the British government stopped giving them security. In court, a lawyer for the government claimed that "police officers should be allowed to be hired as private bodyguards for the wealthy." Harry has said that he doesn't feel safe going to Britain with his young children because of the rude press cameras there.
The case was argued last week, on the same day that Harry and Meghan went to a New York police station to hide from cameras after a spokesperson said they had been in a "near-catastrophic car chase" with photographers after a gala event. No one was hurt, and no tickets were given, but the cops said that photographers made it hard for the couple to get where they were going.
Harry is also fighting the decision that the government won't pay for his protection. This is the only one of the five lawsuits he has going on in London courts that aren't against British newspaper publishers for libel or phone hacking.

Conclusion

The Duke of Sussex, Prince Harry, failed in his attempt to overturn a decision that says he can't pay for police protection while he is in the United Kingdom. On Tuesday, a court said that Harry can't bring a second case against the U.K. Home Office to question their position that protection from the Metropolitan Police can't be bought.
Harry, who is fifth in line for the throne, is fighting back against a decision by the government that his family won't get automatic police protection in Britain after he and his wife Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, quit their jobs as top working royals in 2020. At the time, a group called RAVEC, the Executive Committee for the Protection of Royalty and Public Figures, decided that the Sussexes would get security on a case-by-case basis.
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Camilo Wood

Camilo Wood

Author
Camilo Wood has over two decades of experience as a writer and journalist, specializing in finance and economics. With a degree in Economics and a background in financial research and analysis, Camilo brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to his writing. Throughout his career, Camilo has contributed to numerous publications, covering a wide range of topics such as global economic trends, investment strategies, and market analysis. His articles are recognized for their insightful analysis and clear explanations, making complex financial concepts accessible to readers. Camilo's experience includes working in roles related to financial reporting, analysis, and commentary, allowing him to provide readers with accurate and trustworthy information. His dedication to journalistic integrity and commitment to delivering high-quality content make him a trusted voice in the fields of finance and journalism.
Dexter Cooke

Dexter Cooke

Reviewer
Dexter Cooke is an economist, marketing strategist, and orthopedic surgeon with over 20 years of experience crafting compelling narratives that resonate worldwide. He holds a Journalism degree from Columbia University, an Economics background from Yale University, and a medical degree with a postdoctoral fellowship in orthopedic medicine from the Medical University of South Carolina. Dexter’s insights into media, economics, and marketing shine through his prolific contributions to respected publications and advisory roles for influential organizations. As an orthopedic surgeon specializing in minimally invasive knee replacement surgery and laparoscopic procedures, Dexter prioritizes patient care above all. Outside his professional pursuits, Dexter enjoys collecting vintage watches, studying ancient civilizations, learning about astronomy, and participating in charity runs.
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