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The Eyes Of Some Young Fruit Flies Appear To Bulge Out Of Their Head, Scientists Find

Despite the awkwardness of the transition to maturity, at least our eyes don't protrude from our skulls on stalks longer than our legs. But the eyes of some young fruit flies appear to bulge out of their head. According to Science News, a recent research found that the eye-up metamorphosis in P. tangliangi, one of the stalkier species, only takes approximately 50 minutes. The eyes of a fly are permanently fixed in an outward position, like a selfie stick, because when the thin eyestalks are stretched, they darken and harden.

Author:Daniel James
Reviewer:Karan Emery
Nov 09, 2022
3.2K Shares
65.8K Views
Despite the awkwardness of the transition to maturity, at least our eyes don't protrude from our skulls on stalks longer than our legs. But the eyes of some young fruit flies appear to bulge out of their head.
According to Science News, A recent research found that the eye-up metamorphosis in P. tangliangi, one of the stalkier species, only takes approximately 50 minutes. The eyes of a fly are permanently fixed in an outward position, like a selfie stick, because when the thin eyestalks are stretched, they darken and harden.
The first published picture sequence of P. tangliangi's ocular flowering appeared in the September Annals of the Entomological Society of America, including details of the insect's eye lift. Researchers in the field of biology have identified eight distinct groups of flies that exhibited the evolution of eyestalks. However, Pelmatops flies have received so little scientific attention that many aspects of their fundamental biology remain unanswered.

Irregularity In Eyestalks Curl And Rise

The video footage demonstrates how the eyestalks coil and ascend at strange angles. According to Xiaolin Chen, an entomologist and evolutionary scientist at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, they are not flailing around when just partially inflated. They seem to be somewhat rigid, yet sufficiently adaptable.
If Chen and her team have located suitable females, they may be able to rear offspring with shorter eyestalks. As a result of the small sample size, Chen wonders whether the two species now recognized may really be merely the male and female forms of the same species mislabeled. A male P. tangliangiis seen in the new study mating with a female of a different species. She has some stalks, albeit they aren't as impressive as his.
Long eyestalks may give flies a sense of arrogance, despite the fact that the headpiece might be a weight for a flying bug. This species of fly, along with others like it, the Pelmatops, are known for engaging in eye-to-eye combat with haughty visitors.
However, when a fly has a disagreement with another fly, there will be no stalks being locked and knocked. Chen claims that any pushing or shoving is "done with other bodily parts."

Final Words

There might be a variety of advantages to having such exceptional eyes. Chen discovers these fruit flies in the wild on the tall stems of Rubus berry brambles. Flies can see potential threats while remaining concealed in the foliage because to their eyes' innate ability to periscope outward and upward.
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Daniel James

Daniel James

Author
Daniel James is a distinguished gerontologist, author, and professional coach known for his expertise in health and aging. With degrees from Georgia Tech and UCLA, including a diploma in gerontology from the University of Boston, Daniel brings over 15 years of experience to his work. His credentials also include a Professional Coaching Certification, enhancing his credibility in personal development and well-being. In his free time, Daniel is an avid runner and tennis player, passionate about fitness, wellness, and staying active. His commitment to improving lives through health education and coaching reflects his passion and dedication in both professional and personal endeavors.
Karan Emery

Karan Emery

Reviewer
Karan Emery, an accomplished researcher and leader in health sciences, biotechnology, and pharmaceuticals, brings over two decades of experience to the table. Holding a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences from Stanford University, Karan's credentials underscore her authority in the field. With a track record of groundbreaking research and numerous peer-reviewed publications in prestigious journals, Karan's expertise is widely recognized in the scientific community. Her writing style is characterized by its clarity and meticulous attention to detail, making complex scientific concepts accessible to a broad audience. Apart from her professional endeavors, Karan enjoys cooking, learning about different cultures and languages, watching documentaries, and visiting historical landmarks. Committed to advancing knowledge and improving health outcomes, Karan Emery continues to make significant contributions to the fields of health, biotechnology, and pharmaceuticals.
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